fragment of a screenaplay

Mostly for my own amusement I am posting this short section of a screenplay, which says something about this topic. The first section is just to establish the characters, part of an unusual family, then the next section is about the compatibility problem. Sorry about the wrong formatting. Cutting from a real application and pasting into this blogging software screws it all up.
——————-
FADE IN:
INT. GREEN FAMILY BUILDING
A tall slim woman about 30 is talking to a taller
man in his early 50s.
SARAH RIVERS
Ken, I think you should talk to Beth.
She doesn’t seem happy. She is
beginning to develop, you know, and
David won’t leave her alone. I think
he wants to examine the subject first
hand.
KEN GREEN
Well, I would have, at his age. But
if she is not happy I will have to
talk to her. I can always do that.
INT. BETH’S ROOM
Beth’s room is filled with books and computer
equipment.
KEN
Hi there, beautiful. Bethie, dear.
I am a bit worried about you. Your
mother doesn’t think you are very
happy.
BETH GREEN
Daddy, do I have to go to school?
KEN
No. You have to get an education.
But it doesn’t have to be in school.
You could stay home and study with
Annette or another teacher, if you
want.
BETH
I think I will, if you don’t mind.
KEN
It’s OK with me. I’ll square it
with your mother. You’re too smart
for that grade at school anyway.
Annette or one of the others can
handle most of it, but I’ll do some
of it with you myself for math or
the hard sciences. You are way ahead
of them, there.
A few days later. Books are spread about. Ken
has been giving a lesson to his daughter
KEN
… And so, Bethie, that was wave
mechanics. It later fell out of
favor, not before Louis de Broglie
received the Nobel prize in physics
for it.
BETH
But Daddy, it is so mathematical, he
should have received the Nobel prize
in mathematics for it instead,
shouldn’t he, Daddy?
KEN
Well there is no Nobel prize in
mathematics, Beth.
BETH
That’s silly. Why not?
KEN
Well, Alfred Nobel, the man who
donated the money for the prizes
apparently didn’t think mathematics
was as important. He left out
biology, too, though he included
medicine.
BETH
What about computer science?
KEN
The early mechanical computers were
almost unknown or jokes or annoying
office machines at best. Nobody
thought they would ever be important
and Alfred Nobel didn’t either.
BETH
Are all Nobel prizes forever to be
determined by the prejudices of one
man, Daddy?
KEN
No, much later, in the 1960s sometime,
the national bank of Sweden donated
the money for a Nobel prize in
economics.
BETH
Well somebody should donate the money
for a Nobel prize in mathematics.
KEN
Well, I’m trying to fund the creation
of a university, Beth.
BETH
Oh, I didn’t mean you, silly. I
know enough to know that the Nobel
prizes are paid out on the interest
from the original amount of money
that the guy left in his will, right?
They are about a million bucks, Daddy,
so it would take at least 10 million
to fund a new one, and probably more
like 30 million, right? I don’t
think you have that kind of money.
KEN
Beth.
BETH
You do?
KEN
Well, the university is going to
cost me at least 100 million, and
probably a lot more. A lot more.
BETH
Holy Cow, Daddy. Did you inherit
this, or get it doing business, or
something?
KEN
In business.
BETH
If you are the important business
kind of guy with that much money,
how come you have so much time to
spend playing with your children?
KEN
I would let it all dribble away before
I gave up a single minute playing
with my children. Especially you.
BETH
Oh, Daddy. So, here’s what you do,
Daddy. Put your loose change in a
piggy bank. You probably have a lot
of loose change. If you put only
the tiny bit you can afford without
hurting your university or family
into a piggy bank, say a few thousand
a year, or whatever it is, then maybe
you can fund a Nobel prize in
mathematics some year.
KEN
Yes, I guess that would work. Maybe
I could do computing science as well.
I could probably put together 100
million worth of loose change in 10
or 15 years.
BETH
Daddy, you are teasing me!
KEN
No I’m not, Beth.
BETH
How much money do you have, anyway?
KEN
Well, lots.
BETH
Are you a billionaire, Daddy?
KEN
Please don’t tell anyone, Beth, but
yes, I am.
BETH
Wow, rich Daddy! OK, I won’t tell.
I guess that’s how you can afford to
have dozens of children.
KEN
Beth, I have hundreds of children.
BETH
Oh. Oh, yeah, I guess I knew that.
So many leave with their mommy’s
that I forget. Daddy, you are a
very unusual man!
KEN
(looking straight at
his first child)
I think if I’d stopped after the
first, I would be almost as happy.
Pretty Beth blushes, pleased with his praise.
BETH
Oh, Daddy. You are so nice. Well,
if you are rich rich rich, I think
you should start that piggybank and
try to setup those two new Nobel
prizes within a couple of decades.
OK?
KEN
OK, I promise. But you have to try
to win one of them, alright?
BETH
Well, maybe, but I think my field is
social technology. I guess you can’t
endow a prize for a discipline you
almost invented, especially when
nobody seems to be doing it. Let’s
revisit that question in a decade or
two, OK, Daddy?
KEN
Sure thing, princess.
INT. GREEN FAMILY BUILDING – DAY
Facing away from a communal cooking and dining
area is a row of what looks like model houses,
houses reduced in scale to fit underneath a 12
foot ceiling. The rightmost one of these houses
Ken Green, owner of the building and progenitor of
the many children who reside in the other half of
the building. Ken’s 11 year old daughter Beth
Green approaches and knocks on the door of her
father’s house. He opens it and looks out at her
smiling happily down on his favorite child.
BETH
Daddy. Do you have a few moments?
KEN
I always have time for you, Beth.
BETH
Good. Though I’d never want to take
you away from one of the mommies or
prospective mommies. But if you
really do have time, let’s go to the
library.
KEN
True, I do have my duties. But you
have caught me at a good time, at
rest between my labors. Let us go
to the library, then.
INT. LIBRARY WITHIN GREEN FAMILY BUILDING
A large room filled with books and large filing
cabinets. There are a couple of tables with
chairs around them, and some more comfortable
chairs nearby. Beth sits down at a table,
motioning her father to sit beside her. She
points at a small stack of three books in front of
her and slightly to one side. Her father gives a
look of distaste.
KEN
(with a theatrical
moan)
Oh. Those.
BETH
Yes, Daddy, I’ve read them.
KEN
Beth, I am surprised at you. I have
always felt you to be Number One.
You have always been number one to
me, but now it seems you are number
two.
BETH
I am?
KEN
Yes indeed. I believe Edna Stiller
read them a few years ago. She was
the first, so far as I know.
BETH
Yes. I’ve spoken to Edna. She says
they are brilliant, but much much
too difficult. She tried to use the
easiest one for a college class once,
but the students found it too hard.
Anyway, nevermind. Nevermind. Let’s
move on to the little demonstration
I have prepared.
KEN
(relieved)
Please.
Beth has three cardboard boxes sitting in front of
her, each for a small jigsaw puzzle.
BETH
Behold. The puzzles. Let me just
shove these books aside and the first
one.
KEN
I seem to remember you graduating
from jigsaw puzzles to advanced math
about age 3, Bethie.
BETH
Yes, and it may have been too soon,
as you will see.
Beth dumps the first box out on the table and
starts turning pieces over, face up, and grouping
them together by appearance. After a moment, her
father begins to help.
BETH
Good, Daddy. You are doing the right
thing. You see, you first turn find
pieces that fell out of the box upside
down so that you can see what they
look like, then you move them around.
Human society, Daddy. Human society.
You are trying to fit the pieces
together.
KEN
Alright, good metaphor.
BETH
Yes. Now some fixed point theorem
says there is a piece we don’t have
to move, but in practice we have to
move all the pieces around. Nothing
stays where it was. We don’t just
try to force any of them to fit with
some other piece that happens to be
nearby, do we?
KEN
Ah. So you have read the books.
Depressing, isn’t it. Imagine several
billion pieces, scattered all over
the world. Imagine trying to fit
all of them together.
BETH
Relatively easy, Daddy. Now let me
sweep this aside so we can look at
the second box.
Beth opens the second box to reveal a puzzle that
is all put together nicely lying in the bottom of
the box.
BETH
Now this one I have put together.
So, if I am careful …
She quickly turns the box over. The puzzle comes
out upside down, with almost all the pieces still
stuck together. Rather than trying to put those
back in place, she scatters them around randomly.
BETH
Doesn’t this seem a bit more like
reality, Daddy? Not only are the
pieces scattered about at random,
but we can’t see what they really
look like. Each one is a mystery to
us. Just as the people around us
are all mysteries. We can’t see
what they are really like, inside.
KEN
Yes. I get it. Let’s say that if
two pieces happen to be side by side
they can talk each other into turning
face to face, showing each other
their faces. Even then …
BETH
Yes, even then. Billions of
mysteries, scattered all over the
globe. Yet think about a jigsaw
puzzle, Daddy. The pieces are all
different in shape and will only go
together one way. Maybe a few pieces
will almost fit and can be forced,
but there is one solution we are
trying for.
KEN
So what is in the other box?
BETH
Well, let me show you.
She opens the final box. In it is also a puzzle
nicely put together. She briefly shows it to him,
then turns it over carefully, then scatters the
upside down pieces at random, as before. But this
time the pieces have various esoteric signs and
symbols stamped on their backs.
KEN
Ah. What do the symbols mean, Beth?
BETH
That is for you to figure out, Daddy.
I won’t guarantee that they mean
anything. Also, some of these pieces
may be lying. Some of these ones
stamped with a happy face may actually
be only pretending to have a sunny
disposition. Marry one and you
realize it should have had pitchforks
stamped upon it.
KEN
Other than the ones that lie, should
we try to put ones bearing similar
symbols together?
BETH
Maybe, maybe not. Maybe their is
some preferred way of matching them,
so we should always match up the
triangles with a specific star shape.
I won’t tell you the answer, Daddy.
People don’t know any such rules, do
they? No, Daddy, this is human
society, not just a collection of
mysteries, but mysteries with
mysterious clues that may be
meaningful or not. They may be lies,
but even if correct, nobody knows
how to interpret them.
KEN
I seem to remember a conclusion that
depressing, somewhere, but you have
expressed it brilliantly. Just what
I would have expected from the
smartest girl in the world.
BETH
If I’m so smart, how come I can’t
figure out how I will ever find myself
someone when I grow up. I am not
going to fall for someone I just
happen to run into, Daddy. And I am
not going to pretend I have figured
out the clues and know the right
person. So what am I to do? Will I
ever have a truly compatible husband,
Daddy?
KEN
Well you know, Beth, no father wants
to think of his little girl in the
arms of a man anyway.
BETH
Too bad. I am going to have a real
life, Daddy, out in the real world,
a full life, with all that entails.
I have lived my whole life in this
building, you know. I’ve been very
happy here, but you know what happens
to kids eventually. It is inevitable.
KEN
I suppose it is.
BETH
Fine. Glad you agree. Well, I am
now a very mature 11 year old, wise
beyond my years. Wise enough to
know that you have not a day over
five years to fix this, Daddy.
KEN
How am I suppose to do that?
BETH
Didn’t you ever hire some expert
advice about this, Daddy.
KEN
Of course I did. The experts mostly
concluded it was unsolvable, except
for those who thought it was trivially
easy. Those who had that idea were
just envisioning a fancy dating
service.
BETH
Did you ever use a dating service,
Daddy?
KEN
Ouch. The less said about that, the
better. Let’s just say that they
either pretend to read the cryptic
signs on the backs of the puzzle
pieces, or they stamp more symbols
on them and leave you to puzzle them
out. Nothing useful. I think they
are mathematically impossible anyway.
BETH
Well, we have to figure out how to
do this. Five years, Daddy. I don’t
want to be the only 16 year old
without a date.
KEN
Oh, Bethie, please. No dating until
you are at least 30, please.
BETH
No, I am not going to be waiting
around till the bloom is off this
rose, no matter what your fatherly
preferences might be. Five years.
KEN
You will have to help, then.
BETH
Of course I will help. Now Daddy,
you are going to hire a bunch more
experts. But this time I will help
you select them, and we will show
them the rejected results of your
earlier studies right up front.
Anyone who suspects one conclusion
or the other might be right will not
get the job. You are a rich man,
Daddy, you can afford to throw some
money at this. To start with, I
think we should rent me a numerical
methods expert and a discreet math
person, someone who designs
algorithms. OK?
KEN
Done. I’ll get your mother to start
making some queries.
BETH
Good.
With her fathers help, Beth shovels the puzzle
pieces back into the boxes, stacks the boxes up,
on top of one another, then piles the three books
on top. Her father again looks at them with
distaste.
——

dpw

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply